kindle Kepler's Witch: An Astronomer's Discovery of Cosmic Order Amid Religious War, Political Intrigue, and the Heresy Trial of His MotherAuthor James A. Connor – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

Kepler s life is the core of this book Weaved from Kepler s journal is a story of a particular time in the Christian faith and Kepler s response Cycles of productivity and depression due to various circumstances enabled Kepler to write a variety of books Portions of the science, novelty, and philosophy in those books are summarized in this book, but as this book is about the life of Kepler, detail regarding the intimates of his insights are lacking The way Kepler s insights interacted with t Kepler s life is the core of this book Weaved from Kepler s journal is a story of a particular time in the Christian faith and Kepler s response Cycles of productivity and depression due to various circumstances enabled Kepler to write a variety of books Portions of the science, novelty, and philosophy in those books are summarized in this book, but as this book is about the life of Kepler, detail regarding the intimates of his insights are lacking The way Kepler s insights interacted with the political sphere of his life are ubiquitous As Kepler s father was rarely home, Kepler s mother, Katharina, took care of him and his siblings It was when Katharina took Kepler to see a comet that potentially inspired Kepler to become an astronomer But the character type that she passed onto Kepler was extreme stubbornness When they believed they were right, they would not let it go With Katharina, it can be expressed as her innocence of witchcraft as she came back to her city and thought that the truth would win With Kepler it was heresy, because he would not agree to a bit of the church s stance, he would fight for his intellectual freedom The belief in witches was a worldview rather than a superstition The worldview held that for every problem, there must have been some benefactor People blamed as various problems on witches, and as witches had caused the problem, they demanded the which to rectify it The choosing of who was a witch was based on oddity As communities rarely saw different people, the individuals in the community which were deemed odd became highly likely to be considered as witches 75% of witches were women with the description of a witch matching the description of an old women during those times It was conflict with the neighbors that caused witches to be persecuted, not a different faith For Katharina, it was partly due to her herbal medicine and jealously of Kepler that caused the community to turn against her Kepler was an imperial mathematician with his own problem of heresy The community might have wanted to accuse Kepler, but he had powerful political influence Katharina did not have such influence, and as Kepler s influence was far away, the community could make her suffer Only with powerful political influence could an accused be spared Katharina s trial was much like other witch trials Many trial claims were not based on witness accounts, but because they were a presumed requirement for a witch Kepler s trouble with the church was based on disagreed with a small part of the church s ideology, the ubiquity doctrine His greatest crime, wanting peace between Christian sects At a time when every denomination was looking for war, peace was heresy For Kepler s believes, he was excommunicated from his own church, and would not convert to the Catholic church which wanted him He remained a devout Lutheran, and as a Lutheran debate was normal At the time, the church was a normal place for intellectual discussion.Lutherans appear to follow the original understanding of Christianity, that faith was a matter of personal conscience To preserve a faith and prevent a battle of confusion, the church was needed to create some uniformity The reformation occurred because too much power was held in the authorities Luther revived the individual faith and individual conscience ideas Kepler s disagreement with the Lutheran church should have been acceptable, but his own church required conformity As Kepler reasoned, religion should be protected by theological debate, not soldiers The religious war caused difficulties with intellectual freedom Kepler recognized that any disagreement was cause for denunciation Agreeing little bit with a different faith was cause for heresy The science of Kepler cannot be easily separated from his faith Kepler was thinking of planets and stars because that got him closer to the secret of God s mind The solutions for his work and faith, Kepler would need to study and find the solutions on his own He could not be told to believe in an idea for credulous reasons We would not take a position he did not fully believe in Astronomy at the time was about appearances in space while physics was about movements on earth Kepler wanted to understand what actually happened, rather than their appearance When Kepler was lent a telescope, he formed a group to act as a sort of controlled experiment Each person taking turns with the observations and sharing the findings after everyone had taken their own observations An interesting note on Kepler is that he formed the bases of the 1st and 2nd law of gravity, which was to be named later by Newton Part of Kepler s astronomy work included the Rudolphine Tables which used his mentors and colleague s data The data of Tycho Brahe, like all astronomer s data, was well guarded Kepler wanted the data to beopen, but the astronomer s data was connected to their reputations Although Kepler was never rich, and his family was usually impoverished due to the imperial promised income that never came, another source of income for Kepler was astrology Although skeptical of astrology, he was known for pretty accurate predictions about an uncertain future.This book covered Kepler s life at every juncture From the difficulty of his work to the tragedies of losing many children, Conner wrote a complete picture of what made Kepler From family to politics, from witchcraft to religion, Kepler s responses were well explained Short synopsis of the scientific achievements were provided Fascinating book for those who know something of Kepler from the science realm but know little about his personal life He went through an amazing number of hardships, which makes it all theamazing that he accomplished what he did in astronomy It also gave me a new respect for him as a Christian who followed his own conscience, even though it caused him lots of grief in his personal life Better to be true to one s conscience than to please men.The story of Kepler s mother, who was accuse Fascinating book for those who know something of Kepler from the science realm but know little about his personal life He went through an amazing number of hardships, which makes it all theamazing that he accomplished what he did in astronomy It also gave me a new respect for him as a Christian who followed his own conscience, even though it caused him lots of grief in his personal life Better to be true to one s conscience than to please men.The story of Kepler s mother, who was accused of being a witch, was also fascinating This was a time when trials of witches were common Fortunately, although she was eventually convicted, she was not sentenced to death Set against the backdrop of the witchcraft trial of his mother, this lively biography of Johannes Kepler the Protestant Galileo and th century mathematician and astronomer reveals the surprisingly spiritual nature of the quest of early modern scienceIn the style of Dava Sobel s Galileo s Daughter, Connor s book brings to life the tidal forces of Reformation, Counter Reformation, and social upheaval Johannes Kepler, who discovered the three basic laws of planetary motion, was persecuted for his support of the Copernican system After a neighbour accused his mother of witchcraft, Kepler quit his post as the Imperial mathematician to defend herJames Connor tells Kepler s story as a pilgrimage, a spiritual journey into the modern world through war and disease and terrible injustice, a journey reflected in the evolution of Kepler s geometrical model of the cosmos into a musical model, harmony into greater harmony The leitmotif of the witch trial adds a third dimension to Kepler s biography by setting his personal life within his own times The acts of this trial, including Kepler s letters and the accounts of the witnesses, although published in their original German dialects, had never before been translated into English Echoing some of Dava Sobel s work for Galileo s Daughter, Connor has translated the witch trial documents into English With a great respect for the history of these times and the life of this man, Connor s accessible story illuminates the life of Kepler, the man of science, but also Kepler, a man of uncommon faith and vision An odd book in some ways Great topic about the great German astronmer s life and work and the turmoil of religious intolerance and ignorance that often inhibited his great work and hounded his poor mother to death However, the book is not well integrated and often repetitive Despite these problems it is well worth the reading. Joint reviewHeavenly IntrigueBy Joshua Gilder and Anne Lee GilderKepler s WitchBy James A ConnorOne of the delights of reviewing is to have your expectations overturned I was doubly lucky with these two books When I first looked at them, I anticipated that Kepler s Witch would be an intriguing account of one of theobscure events in the life of the great astronomer Johannes Kepler, but that Heavenly Intrigue, which suggests that Kepler murdered his patron Tycho Brahe, would be the work o Joint reviewHeavenly IntrigueBy Joshua Gilder and Anne Lee GilderKepler s WitchBy James A ConnorOne of the delights of reviewing is to have your expectations overturned I was doubly lucky with these two books When I first looked at them, I anticipated that Kepler s Witch would be an intriguing account of one of theobscure events in the life of the great astronomer Johannes Kepler, but that Heavenly Intrigue, which suggests that Kepler murdered his patron Tycho Brahe, would be the work of some cranks with no real understanding of history I was wrong on both counts Kepler lived from 1571 to 1630, making him a contemporary of William Shakespeare and Galileo Galilei The Pilgrim fathers founded the Plymouth colony when Kepler was 49 He was one of the giants on whose work the scientific revolution was based, and in particular he worked out the laws of planetary motion, later used by Isaac Newton in developing his theory of gravity Indeed, it is often wrongly assumed that Newton s famous remark about standing on the shoulders of giants refers to people like Kepler and Tycho In fact, Newton made that remark in the context of his work on light, long before the theory of gravity was developed but as a metaphor, it is still a good description of the relationship between Kepler and Newton Kepler had a tough life, starting out in poverty in the German town of Weil der Statt, with an abusive father, involving a childhood attack of smallpox which left him with weak eyesight, dependant on the observations of other astronomers notably Tycho for the data he needed, and, indeed, including the trial of his elderly mother for witchcraft His story has all the makings of a gripping biography But James Connor s book is not that biography It contains all the facts, but it is a dull read, overlong, and the author wears his learning too self consciously In spite of the title, the story of the witchcraft trial is not central to the book, and the treatment given here only serves to highlight how interesting a shorter,focussed account of this aspect of Kepler s life would be The most surprising feature of the book, to anyone who has studied Kepler s life, is Connor s claim that his subject had an embrace of astrology whichthan anything elseputs Kepler at a distance from our age ED top of page 49 Actually, the impoverished Kepler cast horoscopes only in order to make money, and in his private correspondence referred to his clients as fatheads and described astrology as silly and empty This makes him muchin tune with modern thinking than most of his contemporaries But if Kepler s Witch is disappointing, Heavenly Intrigue is a delight Written muchcrisply and with a momentum that carries the reader along, Joshua Gilder and Anne Lee Gilder take far less space to give us pacey accounts of the lives and times of both their protagonists These are the rich, aristocratic Dane Tycho Brahe who in his youth fought a duel which resulted in a chunk being cut out of his nose, later protected with a silver covering and the low born Kepler, always struggling to make ends meet The story culminates in their eventual meeting This took place in Prague, where the ageing Tycho he lived from 1546 to 1601 had a treasure trove of planetary observations, going back over decades, but lacked the mathematical skills to use these data to find the exact orbits of the planets The younger Kepler had the mathematical skills, but not the data It should have been a marriage made in Heaven, but for reasons which the Gilder s make clear, Tycho was reluctant to part with his data, and Kepler was eager to get on with the job It was only after Tycho died that Kepler, the obvious scientific heir, was able to get hold of the material he needed Contemporary accounts tell us that Tycho was at a banquet in honour of a distinguished guest, and out of politeness did not leave the table to relieve himself during the extended meal in spite of drinking large quantities of wine When he eventually tried to pass urine, he failed and a few days later died in considerable pain, naming Kepler as his scientific heir on his deathbed But there must have been some underlying cause perhaps an infection triggered by the events at the banquet One possibility that would fit the accounts is mercury poisoning, and this is the case that the Gilders make But unlike other authorities, they suggest that the mercury was ingested not as an accidental consequence of Tycho s alchemy experiments, but through the hand of an enemy specifically, Kepler Was Kepler eager enough to get his hands on the data have poisoned Tycho I don t think so, but this account of what might have happened is an enthralling read, as a murder mystery being investigated four centuries after the death Even regarded as science fiction it is informative and entertaining which would be appropriate, since Kepler wrote what many regard as the first science fiction story, an account of a mythical flight to the Moon, designed to present some of his astronomical ideas in an accessible form Heavenly Intrigue is a book I can wholeheartedly recommend to scientists, Sf fans, and lovers of murder mysteries Kepler s Witch will be of interest only to Kepler buffs who want to read everything written about the man What a great book Not so much because of the writing in fact the way the book is written is annoying in many ways, such as repeating things many times and omitting important dates, even the date of Kepler s death But the book is fantastic because of the subject matter Kepler was a fascinating character A world renown scientist and astronomer, but he was also argumentative and difficult to get on with and he had a profound faith in God and would not be swayed in his beliefs no matter how mu What a great book Not so much because of the writing in fact the way the book is written is annoying in many ways, such as repeating things many times and omitting important dates, even the date of Kepler s death But the book is fantastic because of the subject matter Kepler was a fascinating character A world renown scientist and astronomer, but he was also argumentative and difficult to get on with and he had a profound faith in God and would not be swayed in his beliefs no matter how much pressure was put on him And pressure WAS put on him First by the Lutheran church to recant his views of communion, and then by the Catholics who drove him out of home many times because he refused to cede his beliefs to Catholic orthodoxy.And herein is why this book is so great to read Although it doesn t deal with the science and mathematics of Kepler who discovered the laws of planetary motion among other things it does deal with Kepler the man and the society in which he lived The Reformation was in full swing at the end of the 16th century but by the early 17th century the Catholic counter reformation was building, finally culmination in the Thirty Years War a war that engulfed the whole of Europe and cost 8 million lives.This book is not a magnificent work of art and if you wanted to read a comprehensive account of Kepler s life you could probably find a better book But if you want to immerse yourself in the life and times of a scientific giant, if you want to get lost in a fascinating era of history, if you want to read a biography that leaves you wondering what happens next after every chapter, read this one You won t be sorry I completely enjoyed reading this book, even though it wasn t the easiest book to read It take me over a year to read, since I would take breaks to read other books, but I am glad I finished it The life and story of Kepler a dreamer, mathematician, stargazer, astrologer, devoted to his religion and science, father, and son of an accused witch The inside scoop on being an emperor s mathematician, never knowing when you would get paid, moving his family from one place to another, his complete b I completely enjoyed reading this book, even though it wasn t the easiest book to read It take me over a year to read, since I would take breaks to read other books, but I am glad I finished it The life and story of Kepler a dreamer, mathematician, stargazer, astrologer, devoted to his religion and science, father, and son of an accused witch The inside scoop on being an emperor s mathematician, never knowing when you would get paid, moving his family from one place to another, his complete belief in the marriage of science with his religion, and stubborn belief of religious tolerance to the point of being excommunicated from the Lutheran Church The book also made me reminiscence of my trip to Prague and walking around this time in Kepler s footsteps.James A Connor also includes great details into the social arrangements of the day involving marriage and family, along with a glimpse of the political landscape within the towns, among the nobility, and religious leaders of the time Elvira Sanchez Kisser A better title might have been Kepler s Faith His mother s witchcraft trial is important but not central to this overview of Kepler s career Overall a good read, one that brings Kepler to life and gives the reader a taste of the documents that allowed the author to fill out the story, but the book suffers from serious organizational problems Between the flashbacks and the presaging, there is a tedious amount of repetition Couple this with the primary sources that preface each chapter and t A better title might have been Kepler s Faith His mother s witchcraft trial is important but not central to this overview of Kepler s career Overall a good read, one that brings Kepler to life and gives the reader a taste of the documents that allowed the author to fill out the story, but the book suffers from serious organizational problems Between the flashbacks and the presaging, there is a tedious amount of repetition Couple this with the primary sources that preface each chapter and the reader often gets the same facts with little or no added context or information as often as four times Much of the contextualization is well done, but the details about political intrigues and battles including a long and gratuitous description of the atrocities of the sack of Rome a couple of decades before Kepler s birth are out of place and only occasionally tied back into Kepler s story The title is misleading Hardly any of the monograph is concerned with his mother s trial and there is very little about witchcraft at all Most of the book is concerned with minute accomplishments of Kepler and the kind of insignificant details of his personal life I really don t care how many kids he had and when, and what their names were Or worse, the twelve women he almost married are mentioned twice for some odd reason Actually, there is quite a bit of repetition in this, with the same The title is misleading Hardly any of the monograph is concerned with his mother s trial and there is very little about witchcraft at all Most of the book is concerned with minute accomplishments of Kepler and the kind of insignificant details of his personal life I really don t care how many kids he had and when, and what their names were Or worse, the twelve women he almost married are mentioned twice for some odd reason Actually, there is quite a bit of repetition in this, with the same events or people introducedthan once, and utterly wasting my time.I mean, Kepler was an interesting man and had a pretty eventful and tragic life, but this author sort of reduced his life to a laundry list Basically, boring I understand that monographs aren t usually intended to be read cover to cover, but that s what I do with books, and several non fictions have been incredibly interesting to read that way I think this would function best as a reference rather than something to read for general knowledge or entertainment My first introduction to Johannes Kepler came through Carl Sagan s television documentary Cosmos Mr Sagan presented Kepler as proverbial scientific hero like Galileo, a man under intense pressure to recant or revise his work to satisfy prevailing worldviews of the day Yet Kepler was also a devout Lutheran who stood up to the Counter Reformation even as his own church dismissed him Through this book, that sense of Kepler as a brave scientific pioneer was reinforced for me, and I gained new e My first introduction to Johannes Kepler came through Carl Sagan s television documentary Cosmos Mr Sagan presented Kepler as proverbial scientific hero like Galileo, a man under intense pressure to recant or revise his work to satisfy prevailing worldviews of the day Yet Kepler was also a devout Lutheran who stood up to the Counter Reformation even as his own church dismissed him Through this book, that sense of Kepler as a brave scientific pioneer was reinforced for me, and I gained new empathy for his tumultuous and often tragic life in the early 17th Century James A Connor s book is not strictly a biography He invests whole chapters of this book discussing the violent religious political climate against which Kepler made seminal discoveries in orbital and optical mechanics At times I felt Dr Connor got carried away in narrating various battles and political upheavals that didn t involve Kepler directly But overwhelmingly, these sections provided an intense sense of the volatile social climate Kepler had to navigate At times I all but lost my breath realizing how close Kepler came to not living long enough, or well enough, to complete his pioneering calculations calculations that prepared the way for Isaac Newton s later, andfamous, successes Ultimately, Dr Connor s book is an emotional and spiritual portrait, which given that Kepler likely went to his grave with a firm hope in Christian salvation, is entirely appropriate It also makes Kepleraccessible to non scientists like me Dr Connor is a former Jesuit priest, and that sensibility serves him well in humanizing Kepler Though the sometimes wandering narrative structure of this book stalled my reading at times, I felt an expanded gratitude for Kepler and his work