read online Prime The Scientists: A History of Science Told Through the Lives of Its Greatest InventorsAuthor John Gribbin – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

Phew A really great history of science starting with the 15th century and working right up to the present day Focusing on not just the scientific discoveries but the scientists themselves, this gives a really human feel to the story of science We get to know a little about everyone s life, from Copernicus to Einstein Also touching on a bit of the classical Greek period, where philosophy overlapped with science Gribbin s style of writing is comprehensive without being too much He acknowledg Phew A really great history of science starting with the 15th century and working right up to the present day Focusing on not just the scientific discoveries but the scientists themselves, this gives a really human feel to the story of science We get to know a little about everyone s life, from Copernicus to Einstein Also touching on a bit of the classical Greek period, where philosophy overlapped with science Gribbin s style of writing is comprehensive without being too much He acknowledges that he cannot fit everything in, but still makes sure we know where to findinformation This is separated into all the differing types of science, astronomy, physics, touching on mathematics, astrophysics, andI enjoyed this, and even though parts of it were a bit past my intelligence to fully understand, it will be good to use in future as a reference I would like to readof John Gribbin s popular science books This book manages to accomplish the not insignificant feat of taking material which is intrinsically fascinating, feeding it into a kind of death prose generating machine, and regurgitating it as what feels like a single 600 page long indigestible eructation to mix my digestive metaphors.Shame on you, John Gribbin In producing this ill gotten lumpen tour, which manages to leach all the interest out of what should be a fascinating magical mystery tour, all you have managed to illuminate are th This book manages to accomplish the not insignificant feat of taking material which is intrinsically fascinating, feeding it into a kind of death prose generating machine, and regurgitating it as what feels like a single 600 page long indigestible eructation to mix my digestive metaphors.Shame on you, John Gribbin In producing this ill gotten lumpen tour, which manages to leach all the interest out of what should be a fascinating magical mystery tour, all you have managed to illuminate are the deathly pedestrian contours of your own imagination starved mind.Should anyone be tempted by this dismal tome, be aware that, despite its 600 pages, its coverage of biology is scant and cartoonlike The view is almost exclusively that of an ill read physicist I started out loving this book, it gave glimpses into the men who helped form science When we approached the modern era, a time when some of the scientists discussed are still alive possibly, the tone changed the book stopped being about the people andonly about the science It was this change that threw me off I suppose there is a valid reason to not continue the quirks to include something like Richard Dawkins has had a propensity to wear short shorts in public places which I hav I started out loving this book, it gave glimpses into the men who helped form science When we approached the modern era, a time when some of the scientists discussed are still alive possibly, the tone changed the book stopped being about the people andonly about the science It was this change that threw me off I suppose there is a valid reason to not continue the quirks to include something like Richard Dawkins has had a propensity to wear short shorts in public places which I have witnessed , but it was precisely that the insights into scientists like Newton and Linnaeus were so fascinating to me.Plus the soap box on the end about how sociologists and historians malign science by not giving it its merited status and instead consider it as not quite theory and merely subject to the whims of people I thought that was unnecessary Magnificent tour de force on the development of science as we know it.With one big limitation, which the author duly acknowledges it doesn t cover advances and breakthroughs in medical science, no matter how stupendous they were If you want to see how discoveries of vaccination, microbes and viruses, anaesthesia etc fit into a larger context of science development, you better look elsewhere Names of Jenner, Pasteur, Koch, Flemming and multiple others are found nowhere on its pages There y Magnificent tour de force on the development of science as we know it.With one big limitation, which the author duly acknowledges it doesn t cover advances and breakthroughs in medical science, no matter how stupendous they were If you want to see how discoveries of vaccination, microbes and viruses, anaesthesia etc fit into a larger context of science development, you better look elsewhere Names of Jenner, Pasteur, Koch, Flemming and multiple others are found nowhere on its pages There you may encouter only subtlest hints on how major events in chemistry, physics, biology and in scientific method in general affected medicine.Yet, since it wasor less unambigously declared by the author, the abscence of such narrative could not be considered a book s flaw Excellent account otherwise A wonderfully readable account of scienti c development over the past ve hundred years, focusing on the lives and achievements of individual scientists, by the bestselling author of In Search of Schr dinger s CatIn this ambitious new book, John Gribbin tells the stories of the people who have made science, and of the times in which they lived and worked He begins with Copernicus, during the Renaissance, when science replaced mysticism as a means of explaining the workings of the world, and he continues through the centuries, creating an unbroken genealogy of not only the greatest but also the obscure names of Western science, a dot to dot line linking amateur to genius, and accidental discovery to brilliant deductionBy focusing on the scientists themselves, Gribbin has written an anecdotal narrative enlivened with stories of personal drama, success and failure A bestselling science writer with an international reputation, Gribbin is among the few authors who could even attempt a work of this magnitude Praised as a sequence of witty, information packed tales and a terri c read by The Times upon its recent British publication, The Scientists breathes new life into such venerable icons as Galileo, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Linus Pauling, as well as lesser lights whose stories have been undeservedly neglected Filled with pioneers, visionaries, eccentrics and madmen, this is the history of science as it has never been told before From the Hardcover edition I feel a little silly to be disappointed that a book about scientists had too much science for my enjoyment The history of science is fascinating To think of how much our knowledge has grown in just 500 years and exponentially over the past 200 It really wasn t so long ago that most educated people believed the stars controlled our destiny and to protect ourselves from magic we needed to burn fellow humans to death.The early scientists were heroic as they challenged the orthodoxy of state a I feel a little silly to be disappointed that a book about scientists had too much science for my enjoyment The history of science is fascinating To think of how much our knowledge has grown in just 500 years and exponentially over the past 200 It really wasn t so long ago that most educated people believed the stars controlled our destiny and to protect ourselves from magic we needed to burn fellow humans to death.The early scientists were heroic as they challenged the orthodoxy of state and church.The first half of Gribben s history is fascinating, Likely because I could understand 80% of the rudimentary science As time passed my understanding plummeted and so did my reading pleasure I m sure ascientifically astute reader will getenjoyment from this history than I A history of science told in many lives each chapter focusing on one aspect of the history of science, with the chapter itself being a chronologically ordered story of scientific lives In that aspect, it s very much like Bell s Men Of Mathematics GR link, my review , not only is The Scientists structured similarly, the humorous tone and fun anecdotes are similar too Henry was painfully shy and hardly ever went out except to scientific gatherings even at these, latecomers sometimes found hi A history of science told in many lives each chapter focusing on one aspect of the history of science, with the chapter itself being a chronologically ordered story of scientific lives In that aspect, it s very much like Bell s Men Of Mathematics GR link, my review , not only is The Scientists structured similarly, the humorous tone and fun anecdotes are similar too Henry was painfully shy and hardly ever went out except to scientific gatherings even at these, latecomers sometimes found him standing outside the door trying to pluck up enough courage to enter, long after he was a respected scientist in his own right He communicated with his servants by writing them notes, wherever possible and there are several stories about how on unexpectedly encountering a woman he did not know, he would shield his eyes with his hand and literally run away.Since the author himself is a astrophysicist the focus is a biton physics, cosmology and astrophysics than on medicine or biology two chapters are on biology one on Lyell Darwin Wallace, one on Mendel manyI haven t heard of before nice Ever heard of Miescher Crick Watson , only one part of a chapter is on medicine, one chapter on geology, the rest is physics but that is a truth of the history of science for a long time, Western scientists focusedon the stars and mechanics than on the human body.Someaspects I noted Science shifted from a often rich gentleman s hobby to a full time profession sometime around Darwin s life I got nostalgic for a time where you could just work your whole life for a king without having to fill out grant applications every few years but then again, you d be dependent on the king s whims and mortality Plus, with only a few outliers it was practically impossible for a poor person to even begin with scientific work The descriptions of Galileo s and Bruno s troubles with the church are great none of the usual martyrs for science stuff,correct focus on political and theological problems here The history of scientists has, weirdly enough, quite a few arians in it Gribbin goes through great pain to make it clear that to become a name in the history of science, it s often not some mythological personal genius, but luck of being the right hard working person at the right position at the right time He often details the people who also made the important discovery at the same time as the famous discoverer made it, but for some reason, have been forgotten by history Fallopian tubes are called tubes even though Fallopio originally described them as brass trumpets , i.e., tubas tubes is a mistranslation Gribbin is no fan of Newton although his discoveries were manifold and important, his rather extreme personality made work for other scientists very hard, and the cult of Newton s personality after Newton s death kept progress in some areas of science behind Gribbin correctly points out that Newton didn t receive the knighthood for his scientific advances, but as a rather grubby bit of political opportunism by Halifax as part of his attempt to win the election of 1705 Especially towards the end this book getsdry, almost as if Gribbin had a deadline coming up and slogged through writing it Dalton discovered colour blindness, as he himself suffered from it Imagine making that discovery Gribbin s not a big fan of Kuhnian scientific revolutions, as the structure and the afterword of this book make it clear To him, scientific progress is developed essentially incremental, step by step.Recommended for Scientists, people interested in history or the history of science You d want to get this book for your kid Along with Carl Sagan s Cosmos and both TV adaptations Because science, properly taught or written about, can be very exciting for a kid to learn This is the story of all its wonders told by bios of the people who invented and discovered them 400 years of science are elegantly compacted into this synthesis, but Gribbin writes with such ease and clarity, with all the pleasures of narrative history, that you don t notice you re learning science Not the You d want to get this book for your kid Along with Carl Sagan s Cosmos and both TV adaptations Because science, properly taught or written about, can be very exciting for a kid to learn This is the story of all its wonders told by bios of the people who invented and discovered them 400 years of science are elegantly compacted into this synthesis, but Gribbin writes with such ease and clarity, with all the pleasures of narrative history, that you don t notice you re learning science Not the tedious memorization of facts in a school textbook This is science as it was discovered, when the scientists had no idea what they had found out, and what they were learning It s really a suspense tale A scientist will do an experiment, not sure whether it will work or not, not knowing what he will discover, and whether his hypothesis will be proven right, or at least not wrong, or whether he will stumble upon something else entirely Something perhaps revolutionary that will permanently change life and the world forever Gribbin structures the story by time and scientific subject We start with Copernicus and Galileo and end with quantum physics and the latest cosmology In between chemistry, evolution, genetics, geology, electromagnetism and the nature of light are elucidated The bios help ease the learning by humanizing it science becomes the discoveries of flawed people, from all classes and walks of life who had desires, fears, rivalries, and lived through turbulent historical times, like everyone else The story of science is a continuum men and women from all through time building and expanding upon the work of the people who came before An essential book for any science library Overview books are tricky, and most fail Many things have happened, y know And a book that includes a great deal of them often turns intowell, into a list of things that have happened This is why all textbooks suck.So one has to pick and choose, and the choice necessarily creates a perspective You ve picked up these select threads, which leaves you inevitably with that picture And the trick in writing a good overview book is to end up with a picture that s interesting, compelling, and mo Overview books are tricky, and most fail Many things have happened, y know And a book that includes a great deal of them often turns intowell, into a list of things that have happened This is why all textbooks suck.So one has to pick and choose, and the choice necessarily creates a perspective You ve picked up these select threads, which leaves you inevitably with that picture And the trick in writing a good overview book is to end up with a picture that s interesting, compelling, and most of all, coherent.I only read 100 pages of Gribbin s book and then set it down, because I have this complicated reading schedule and it called for these 100 pages and then something else I ll come back to the rest later, when it arrives on my mental syllabus But so far, I think Gribbin is picking the right threads I like the line he draws from William Gilbert, of whom I d never heard, to Galileo It was neat I liked learning about Gilbert, and I liked his take on Galileo He s fussy about who he chooses to mention, and how much, and in relation to whom else, and it s working for me.I look forward to getting back to this I even have hopes of bumping it up to five stars when it s all over Phew I was suffering from some serious scientific history fatigue towards the end of this book.Gribbin has produced a very interesting book here The absence of theobscure characters in the history of science or the lack of detail about them was disappointing as was the strong focus on physics but even so this book was enjoyable Gribbin sums up scientific discoveries and theories well and provides the reader with interesting details about well known scientific figures There are a lot of Phew I was suffering from some serious scientific history fatigue towards the end of this book.Gribbin has produced a very interesting book here The absence of theobscure characters in the history of science or the lack of detail about them was disappointing as was the strong focus on physics but even so this book was enjoyable Gribbin sums up scientific discoveries and theories well and provides the reader with interesting details about well known scientific figures There are a lot of gaps in the scientific record when reading and I was getting tired of being told that such and such a theory was beyond the scope of the book but Gribbin is a good story teller and communicator making up for some of the aforementioned shortcomings