[[ download Pdf ]] A Writer's DiaryAuthor Fyodor Dostoyevsky – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

The essential entries from Dostoevsky s complete Diary, called his boldest experiment in literary form, are now available in this abridged edition it is a uniquely encyclopedic forum of fictional and nonfictional genres A Writer s Diary began as a column in a literary journal, but byDostoevsky was able to bring it out as a complete monthly publication with himself as an editor, publisher, and sole contributor, suspending work on The Brothers Karamazov to do so The Diary s radical format was matched by the extreme range of its contents In a single frame it incorporated an astonishing variety of material short stories humorous sketches reports on sensational crimes historical predictions portraits of famous people autobiographical pieces and plans for stories, some of which were never written while others appeared later in the Diary itself A range of authorial and narrative voices and stances and an elaborate scheme of allusions and cross references preserve and present Dostoevsky s conception of his work as a literary whole Selected from the two volume set, this abridged edition of A Writer s Diary appears in a single paperback volume, along with a new condensed introduction by editor Gary Saul Morson


10 thoughts on “A Writer's Diary

  1. Robert Robert says:

    Review A Writer s Diary by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Volume 1 1873 1876 I m almost tempted to say that Dostoevsky became the first blogger when he decided to publish a monthly diary, paid for by subscriptions, in 1873 This literary experiment includes everything from letters, literary battles, and short stories to fragments of poems, recollections and long polemics focused on Russia s system of justice which had undergone a substantial reform in the previous decade It s a whopper of a book, over 7 Review A Writer s Diary by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Volume 1 1873 1876 I m almost tempted to say that Dostoevsky became the first blogger when he decided to publish a monthly diary, paid for by subscriptions, in 1873 This literary experiment includes everything from letters, literary battles, and short stories to fragments of poems, recollections and long polemics focused on Russia s system of justice which had undergone a substantial reform in the previous decade It s a whopper of a book, over 700 pages Do you have to be a Dostoevsky fanatic to want to read it Probably But it s also true that anything Dostoevsky wrote had and still has a relentless force and crackling energy worth exploring.In a very long introductory study, Gary Saul Morson of Northwestern University makes a valiant attempt to suggest that many of Dostoevsky s failings and surprising shifts of genre and subject in his Writer s Diary amount to a new kind of literature I didn t find myself persuaded this was the case, although it is oddly Russian for a writer to push words in any direction he wishes Solzhenitsyn ended up working in a kind of fictional historical pastiche format and didn t like the term novel applied to what he was doing.I won t go through this book item by item, but I did find a few things worth remarking.Dostoevsky s faith in the Russian People and the Russian Orthodox Church was boundless.Dostoevsky was deeply preoccupied with the so called Eastern Question which actually refers to Europe s eastern border on Russia and not to Russia s eastern border with the Orient.He was a man of strange compassion, always ready to take up the pen to assault injustices perpetrated by Russia s new courts.He liked to think of Russia as a kind of new country, still fresh and waking up to its mission on earth.He rejected the notion that pan Slavism was a key to understanding Russia s quarrel with Europe he liked to placeemphasis on a spiritual fraternity that united people under the auspices of the Russian Orthodox Church, or Eastern Orthodox Church, as the case may be though not the Greek Orthodox Church.The line of descent he liked to trace in religious affairs went from Byzantium into what would become Russia, which inherited Orthodoxy in its proper form and had, in some vague way, a claim on Istanbul, or Constantinople He was an unthinking, reflexive anti Semite of the worst kind.He adored children.His capacity to write great courtroom scenes in his novels is mirrored in his Writer s Diary His oratorical power was silent, spoken in ink, but thunders when you read it.He could be whimsical, self deprecating, witty, casual and many other endearing things one wouldn t think of in association with the author of Crime and Punishment.Somehow presumably through intensive reading of newspapers and direct correspondence he was able to keep up with the events of the day, including wars hundreds of miles away from where he wrote, in great detail One wouldn t think one could do that without the benefit of today s instantaneous forms of communications, but I can t see any difference between what he knew about public affairs and what our current pundits knowor don t know H.e was on top of thingsThere is a second volume to The Writer s Diary that covers the years 1877 1881 I ll probably read it because I am, in fact, a Dostoevsky fanatic and generally fascinated by Russian writers and Russia as a country The critically important lesson one learns in the first volume of The Writer s Diary is how alienated, confused, attracted and repelled Dostoevsky was with regard to Europe, not to mention America We follow Putin s Russiaor Yeltsin s Russiaor Gorbachev s Russia and shake our heads That s probably because we don t fathom Russia s sense of difference, vulnerability, and mission vis a vis the West Dostoevsky knew all about it, and it shows up on every page of this large strange book


  2. Steve Evans Steve Evans says:

    This is a specialist book, or at least for those who are pretty keen on the author For them, it is a treasure trove of the good and bad aspects of one of the greatest of all writers The English translation contains about half the text of what was a periodical put out in the years follwing the publication of The Adolescent and before Dostoevsky began serious work on The Brothers Karamazov It contains some wonderful stories, some interesting analyses of current affairs and accounts of intervent This is a specialist book, or at least for those who are pretty keen on the author For them, it is a treasure trove of the good and bad aspects of one of the greatest of all writers The English translation contains about half the text of what was a periodical put out in the years follwing the publication of The Adolescent and before Dostoevsky began serious work on The Brothers Karamazov It contains some wonderful stories, some interesting analyses of current affairs and accounts of interventions in public affairs including Dostoevsky s involvement in a court case of a woman who threw her stepdaughter out a window she lived , who was released There is also full measure of Dostoevsky s anti Semitism that is displayed only fitfully in his works of fiction, and of his pretty nutty beliefs about current affairs I read this book for his belief in The Russian Idea that his native country had a mission to fulfill for the planet he is on this subject eloquent and in his characteristically eccentric fashion, strangely convincing


  3. Fernando Fernando says:

    La edici n completa del Diario de un Escritor tiene 1600 p ginas Est , s lo 300 Adem s de Escritor, Dostoievski era periodista y pod a hacer ensayos realmente extensos a partir de peque as notas que le a en los peri dicos Siempre me pregunto c mo hac a para escribir tanto Realmente admirable


  4. Marius Marius says:

    Nietzsche a spus despre Dostoievski c este singurul psiholog de la care mai poate nv a ceva A spus psiholog i nu a spus politician sau economist sau filosof.Amintind acest lucru trebuie s spun c la politic Dostoievski e varz i nu doar c bate c mpii dar o face cu fanatism i nfl c rare i vine chiar s i spui dac t ceai, filosof r m neai.Cam o treime de carte, Dostoievski te s c ie cu problema Orientului i cu panslavismul De exemplu, spre sf r it, calul lui de b taie devine L Nietzsche a spus despre Dostoievski c este singurul psiholog de la care mai poate nv a ceva A spus psiholog i nu a spus politician sau economist sau filosof.Amintind acest lucru trebuie s spun c la politic Dostoievski e varz i nu doar c bate c mpii dar o face cu fanatism i nfl c rare i vine chiar s i spui dac t ceai, filosof r m neai.Cam o treime de carte, Dostoievski te s c ie cu problema Orientului i cu panslavismul De exemplu, spre sf r it, calul lui de b taie devine Levin, din Anna Karenina Bine n eles, atac ndu l pe Levin l n eap pe Tolstoi adic de ce Levin Tolstoi nu i rupe c ma a de pe el i nu i smulge p rul din cap de grija altor popoare slave asuprite de turci Sincer, c nd am citit Anna Karenina, Levin mi s a p rut foarte echilibrat i de bun sim Nu a pus botul la propagand , a a cum a f cut Dostoievski este vorba de acel gen de propagand clasic din toate r zboaiele, conform c reia du manul arunc copiii n suli , siluie te femeile n timp ce le njunghie cu pumnalul, i jupuie te b rba ii de vii i c nd este na ionalismul mai oribil C nd e impregnat de misticism Dup revolu ia din 89 i la noi au ap rut opinii copil re ti conform c rora Bucure tiul va fi noul Ierusalim i poporul rom n e cel ales etc etc Asemenea gogom nii le a spus i Dostoievski n Jurnal, doar c poporul ales este cel rus Poporul rus va izb vi lumea de ateism i socialism Cine cunoa te istoria poate n elege ironia ru inoas , cu tot bol evismul i materialismul care au urmat cu care am fost blagoslovi i i noi de altfel.Apoi, nu tiu cum un om extraordinar de inteligent ca Dostoievski a putut scrie despre problema jidoveasc E drept, atunci c nd un intelectual ovreu l dojene te ntr o scrisoare c pentru 10% dintre jidanii care s rapace i nesim i i i atac i pe restul de 90% dintre evreii ce tr iesc la limita s r ciei, Dostoievski o cam d n b lb ial A vrea s i g sesc o scuz lui Dostoievski, deoarece e scriitorul meu preferat Pot spune doar c politica ziarului n care i a publicat Jurnalul era de orientare conservatoare, a a c i el s a conformat Sper s m mpac cu g ndul acesta.Am sc pat de chestiile negative din acest Jurnal Acum s vorbesc i despre caracteristicile pozitive, care s infinit mai multe i mi l dezv luie pe Dostoievski a a cum l tiu i l iubesc n primul r nd n Jurnal sunt incluse dou nestemate, Sfioasa i Visul unui om ridicol Aceste dou povestiri sunt extraordinare Sunt at t de profunde nc t a trebuit s trag un scaun i s stau vreo jumate de or s m dezmeticesc sta i Dostoievski pe care l cunosc, nu na ionalistul ridicol.Apoi, Dostoievski ap r i sus ine dreptul femeilor de a avea educa ie universitar Este nemaipomenit i de bun sim O idee foarte progresist pentru vremea aceea, cu mult naintea mi c rilor feministe din rile anglo saxone n sf r it, la un moment dat, n capitolul Un discurs fantastic al pre edintelui completului de judecat am avut norocul s asist la o lec ie rar de pedagogie i psihologie infantil Lec ia are ca punct de plecare cazul familiei Djunkovski, n care p rin ii i au supus copii la chinuri groaznice i la tratamente inumane existau tirile de la ora 5 i pe vremea aia Asemenea discurs este naintea timpului s u.Dostoievski a spus dac ar fi s aleg ntre adev r i Hristos a alege Hristosul n Jurnal explic i dezvolt aceast afirma ie F r credin a n nemurirea sufletului via a devine absurd i singura solu ie r m ne sinuciderea Mi am amintit c tocmai despre absurd i sinucidere a vorbit i Camus n Mitul lui Sisif, ba chiar cu citate din Demonii mi place foarte mult c n Jurnal se explic cele mai importante idei din romanele sale Am n eles mai bine unele lucruri i toat g ndirea din spatele lor Cred c acesta a fost i motivul principal pentru care m am apucat s citesc cu poft cartea asta uria i ceva amuzant Am aflat c existau troli i pe atunci Capitolul Despre scrisorile anonime injurioase trateaz cu amuzament i n elegere aceast chestie


  5. Ben Ben says:

    A keen insight into the life and times of Dostoevsky, his love of his homeland, his creative genius, and his constant compassion.


  6. Bettie Bettie says:

    From Brain Pickings One November night in the 1870s, legendary Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky November 11, 1821 February 9, 1881 discovered the meaning of life in a dream or, at least, the protagonist in his final short story did The piece, which first appeared in the altogether revelatory A Writer s Diary public library under the title The Dream of a Queer Fellow and was later published separately as The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, explores themes similar to those in Dostoyevsky From Brain Pickings One November night in the 1870s, legendary Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky November 11, 1821 February 9, 1881 discovered the meaning of life in a dream or, at least, the protagonist in his final short story did The piece, which first appeared in the altogether revelatory A Writer s Diary public library under the title The Dream of a Queer Fellow and was later published separately as The Dream of a Ridiculous Man, explores themes similar to those in Dostoyevsky s 1864 novel Notes from the Underground, considered the first true existential novel True to Stephen King s assertion that good fiction is the truth inside the lie, the story sheds light on Dostoyevsky s personal spiritual and philosophical bents with extraordinary clarity perhapsso than any of his other published works The contemplation at its heart falls somewhere between Tolstoy s tussle with the meaning of life and Philip K Dick s hallucinatory exegesis Readhere


  7. Majed almajed Majed almajed says:

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  8. Alec Fletcher Alec Fletcher says:

    Dostoevsky is the first writer of literature that I fell in love with Of nineteenth century authors, none had a better eye for the psychology of the downtrodden, the frustrated, the half mad Perhaps this is because he himself was all of these things, at least at certain points in his life He spent four years in a Siberian prison, suffered from a gambling addiction, battled epilepsy and struggled with constant debts Perhaps it takes an erratic soul to accurately depict erratic souls D publi Dostoevsky is the first writer of literature that I fell in love with Of nineteenth century authors, none had a better eye for the psychology of the downtrodden, the frustrated, the half mad Perhaps this is because he himself was all of these things, at least at certain points in his life He spent four years in a Siberian prison, suffered from a gambling addiction, battled epilepsy and struggled with constant debts Perhaps it takes an erratic soul to accurately depict erratic souls D published the Writer s Diary mostly in 1876 1877 Half journalism, half literary experiment, he meant it to be a vessel for his continually evolving views on current events which, by their nature, are currently evolving Gary Saul Morson s foreword labels this a processual approach D did not know how the Diary would evolve because he could neither predict future events nor his contemporary responses he also selected the articles and stories that would show up in this abridgment As far as I can tell, he did a good job everything that is included seemed relevant to my interests in D This means that we get the real Dostoevsky, writing to his readers as if they were close friends, and it s often phenomenal He writes passionately about poor children, about criminals who maybe are not as guilty as it would seem, about the suicide epidemic that seemed to be spreading The small observations and literary detours are the best parts of the Diary , as one can sense the conception of an idea earlier in the work before enjoying its realization later Thepolitical articles are interesting as well, though it s good to know a bit about the complicated politics of Russia in the second half of the nineteenth century D often positions himself in a unique position in the framework of contemporary society he s neither a liberal Westernizer, those who want Russia to emulate European ideals and s, nor a hard line conservative His most constant belief is in the power of the Russian peasant class, whom he calls the People, as he believes that they perfectly embody a Russian national spirit that is inextricably linked with humble, genuine Christianity I read Frank Turner s Dostoevsky biography a few years ago, and, while it covered the Diary , I think I could have benefited from having read it beforehand, as the Diary truly illuminates D s frame of mind But his mind has many ugly features, and these show through As 1877 rolls around, and with it the increasing likelihood of war with Turkey, D betrays himself as a fervent ethno nationalist who wants to lilberate Russia s Slavic brethren in the Balkans from the cruel and malicious Turks While I don t doubt that the Slavs were oppressed by the Turks, D s narrow view about the potentials of this war contrast heavily with the empathy he generally portrays, both in his fiction and in other articles Many get caught up in the patriotism and zeal of war, but D took it a step further Convinced that he understood the way that European history would play out, he writes several times about an impending clash between French socialists allied with papists and German Protestants He predicts that a war will break out, and that Russia, by liberating the Slavs in the East, will be able to spread its strong national idea throughout the Continent, taking the first step in a chain of events that will eventually lead to a universal Christian brotherhood across the globe The spirit of the People would be accepted by all, and love for one s neighbors would be the way of the world Which all sounds nice and one can forgive a man for dreaming, but when such a dream takes hold, a person can excuse many means in order to obtain their preferred end I can t help but see hints of the single mindedness that would lead Europe to destroy itself several decades after D was buried It s interesting to read his predictions now, because, in a way, Russia did spread itself throughout the world, and, in a way, France and Germany did have a climactic clash, but none of it happened for the reasons that D thought it would, and universal Christian brotherhood seems to have been entirely left out And then there s the article semi ironically titled The Jewish Question , in which D defends himself against a host of readers who accused him of anti semitism, but mostly just proves himself as an anti semite in the process D gets so much about empathy and love correct, and it sthan disheartening to see this side of him Yet, for all the flaws, he s a great writer Tolstoy may have beenmodern in his historical philosophical views and in the quality of his sentences, but something about Dostoevsky seems to transcend the normal literary criticisms one might level at him I m reminded of a story in Hemingway s A Moveable Feast in which Hemingway asks a friend how it s possible that D can be so moving when he s such a terrible writer I m also reminded of an essay by David Foster Wallace in which he reviews Frank Turner s Dostoevsky biography and discusses how D., unlike modern or postmodern authors, was truly trying to change the way the world in non artistic ways He thought he had a God given mission to save Russia and direct it toward the future triumph of it and the Christian idea that it embodied, and he took this mission very seriously Strong convictions don t always make great people, but they can make great writers A Writer s Diary shows the convictions and the writing side by side, and thus is remarkable


  9. Andreea Andreea says:

    Welllet me think It is Dostoievski, but somehow different, as expected, probably I was kind of surprised, as I was assuming he will talkabout his literary work, how did he come to write certain novels Of course, you may guess some of his drivers, but the focus is not on him, but on Russian people I have been impressed all the time I was reading it three volumes of about 400 pages about his great love, respect and hopes he had for the people So, actually it is about putting face t Welllet me think It is Dostoievski, but somehow different, as expected, probably I was kind of surprised, as I was assuming he will talkabout his literary work, how did he come to write certain novels Of course, you may guess some of his drivers, but the focus is not on him, but on Russian people I have been impressed all the time I was reading it three volumes of about 400 pages about his great love, respect and hopes he had for the people So, actually it is about putting face to face principles that do not seem to go together and he is trying to explain why and how things came to this Russian people vs Russian elite , Slavic vs non Slavic, Russia vs Europe, war vs peace, Orthodox vs Catholic , mother language vs learned language, justice vs injustice, equity vs, inequity I have to say that as naive he may seem sometimes, his analysis are quite profound and still surprising mind you it was written around 1875 although science, history evolved since then And sometimes you just may find yourself in those times.There are also few pages about Puskin, Tolstoi, about his work He tells stories fictional and non fictional as good as ever, talking about law suits when he is trying to shed some light on the characters and their motivations, and from my point of view these are the best parts and after reading you can say yeah, this is Dostoievski Being Romanian, I was interested to find out how did he see us part of the journal is written in 1877 when we had our Independence war , but alas only few words


  10. Junta Junta says:

    All of Dostoyevsky s heroes question themselves as to the meaning of life In this they are modern they do not fear ridicule What distinguishes modern sensibility from classical sensibility is that the latter thrives on moral problems and the former on metaphysical problems In Dostoyevsky s novels the question is propounded with such intensity that it can only invite extreme solutions Existence is illusory or it is eternal If Dostoyevsky were satisfied with this inquiry, he would be a philo All of Dostoyevsky s heroes question themselves as to the meaning of life In this they are modern they do not fear ridicule What distinguishes modern sensibility from classical sensibility is that the latter thrives on moral problems and the former on metaphysical problems In Dostoyevsky s novels the question is propounded with such intensity that it can only invite extreme solutions Existence is illusory or it is eternal If Dostoyevsky were satisfied with this inquiry, he would be a philosopher But he illustrates the consequences that such intellectual pastimes may have in a man s life and in this regard he is an artist Among those consequences, his attention is arrested particularly by the last one, which he himself calls logical suicide in his Diary of a Writer In the installments for December 1876, indeed, he imagines the reasoning of logical suicide The Myth of Sisyphus, Albert Camus p 101 of 134 March 18, 2016